© WHIM architecture

Image: 3D impression new floating habitats constructed from marine litter

Aspects

Marine litter is not easy to collect from the Ocean. One of the major difficulties is to get the plastics from the ocean water without harming marine life. The plastics, after being in the ocean for years, break into smaller fragments. Samples of these plastics are taken with small mesh sized nets that also catch organisms living in the ocean.

There are many wonderful examples of structures made from recycled plastic, but we still need to test the best recycling method for the plastics that have been floating in the Ocean. These plastics are affected by the salty water and the sun and have become a kind of their own.  

 

And now

Taking this project step by step the proposal is to design a small floating habitat from coastal pollution. Besides the marine litter, there are also huge quantities of plastics being deposited on coastlines.

Image: Coastal pollution, Dakar, Senegal

The realization of a prototype will physically prove our theory and will give us the opportunity to test the strength of the recycled plastics and will stimulate the further development of the project. In this the most suitable recycling techniques are considered. The prototype should be built from hollow building blocks made by recycling the plastic waste from coastlines. These hollow elements will be the components from which Recycled Island will be constructed. The prototype is a small version of an overall concept.

The typical components of the family home: shared space, private space, garden, and service spaces have new constraints imposed by their new littoral contexts, and so the organization of the components themselves is rethought. The recycled plastic creates the possibility of translucent materiality and more fluid connections between spaces.

The creation of the prototype will illustrate:

1: The potential of (sea) plastic recycling.

2. Flood-proof living.

3. Sustainable and self-sufficient housing.

The prototype can eventually be on display in any major (harbour) city.

Image: 3D-impression prototype

Legend image:

1. Single family home.

2. Solar roof.

3. Agriculture for food. Use of compost (toilet).

4. Seaweed cultivation for food and fertilizer.

5. Blue energy from wave motion.

We will further design the prototype to be seaworthy and self-sufficient with the help of our advisors. For the plastic recycling we will visualize the potential that we see and present this to researchers and manufactures that are currently achieving promising results in the creation of composite materials. We are already familiar with the green material WPC (wood-plastic composite), that is successfully used as the top decking of a boat. Seaweed plastic composite are also already under development, but we still need to find the most suitable composite for our project.

Image: Section prototype

Principle section prototype:

1. Platform; Hollow blocks, covered with vegetation.

2. Balustrade; Hollow blocks, filled with soil

3. Roof, Blocks filled with none recyclable waste, covered with solar cells

4. External wall, Blocks filled with none recyclable waste, green façade

 

With the success of the prototype more sustainable and flood-proof habitats can be realized.

 

Your support

We need your support to further design and develop the prototype of Recycled Island. We already have a concept, a first sketch, contact with several plastic recyclers and are sharing our ideas and experiences with volunteers to collect the plastic from coastlines. The unique character of this project results in the interest of the worldwide press.

Image: 3D impression from the prototype at a coastline

Now we need to continue the design so that we can expand the contact with plastic recyclers effectively and start testing the realization of the prototype. The progress of the project can be followed on our website: www.recycledisland.com and on our Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Recycled-island/376692216202 .

 

The budget is required to have a complete design of the prototype in a little bit less than a year. For more information please see our website.

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In the past years

Recycled Island started as a proposal to build a new floating habitat from marine litter in the North Pacific Gyre. This project came from my own personal interest in the possibility of habitats that respond to the rising sea level as well as in the recycled plastics, in particular, sea-waste as a building material. After years of gathering information and speaking to experts I visualized my ideas into a concept design. These images have been published worldwide.

Image: Sketch design prototype Recycled Island

December 2012

Recycled Island is looking for support

We need your support to further design and develop the prototype of Recycled Island. Recycled Island is a proposal for a floating habitat constructed from waste materials. As a building material, for the prototype, we see the potential in recycling coastal pollution. The budget is required to have a complete design of the prototype in a little bit less than a year.  With the success of the prototype more sustainable and flood-proof habitats can be realized.

 

Call for support on Youtube: Recycled Island call for support

 

To support Recycled Island please contact us via

info@whim.nl

NEWS RECYCLED ISLAND CAUSES PUBLICATIONS CONTACT

May 2012

Lecture Recycled island in Delft, the Netherlands

Recycled island is presented on the Kennisfestival in Delft on June 13th 2012.

More info:

http://kennisfestival.net/programma/sprekers/

 

 

 

 

October 2011

Video presentation of Recycled island online.

 

                                  

Design by:
WHIM architecture

March 2013

Recycled Island collaboration in Rotterdam, the Netherlands

Students of the Rotterdam University are exploring the potential of recycling the plastic pollution in the river the Maas to a new floating habitat. The project is a collaboration with the Rotterdam Municipality.

Marine litter is human-created waste that has deliberately or accidentally been released in a lake, sea, ocean or waterway. The Maas (Meuse) is a major European river, rising in France and flowing through Belgium and the Netherlands before draining into the North Sea. It has a total length of 925 km. Rotterdam is the last city the river runs through before it ends in the Sea. Therefor Rotterdam has a large potential in extracting the river’s floating waste before it reaches the sea and becomes part the increasing floating oceanic debris.

Large parts of Rotterdam are below sea level. Floating habitats are climate proof and resistant to flood.

Image: Rotterdam and the Maas via Google Earth

July 2013

RE:Villa; Temporarily design prototype floating villa

 

Together with a naval architect and a building engineer WHIM architecture is further developing the Recycled Island prototype of coastal pollution. The prototype is a floating house with surroundings. This floating villa is constructed from recycled plastic and self-sufficient. The construction principle is based on Yacht building in composite and brings together building engineering with naval architecture.

 

RE:Villa is a proposal for a floating habitat constructed from waste materials. As a building material we’ll  recycle plastic coastal pollution. With the success of the prototype more sustainable and flood-proof habitats can be realized.

 

For more information please contact WHIM architecture via info@whim.nl

Image: 3D-impression temporarily design RE:Villa by WHIM architecture

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August 2013

Floating park of recycled plastic in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

WHIM architecture is exploring the potential of recycling the plastic pollution in the river the Maas to a new floating landscape.

Marine litter is human-created waste that has deliberately or accidentally been released in a lake, sea, ocean or waterway. The Maas (Meuse) is a major European river, rising in France and flowing through Belgium and the Netherlands before draining into the North Sea. It has a total length of 925 km. Rotterdam is the last city the river runs through before it ends in the Sea. Therefor Rotterdam has a large potential in extracting the river’s floating waste before it reaches the sea and becomes part the increasing floating oceanic debris.

Large parts of Rotterdam are below sea level. Floating landscapes are climate proof and resistant to flood.

Image: First sketch Floating park of recycled plastic in Rotterdam

View video on Vimeo. View video on YouTube.

September 2013

‘Good practice’ mentioning at the Eco-innovation Action Plan European Commission.

Rising demand for a better environment has led to an expanding supply of environmentally friendly techniques, products and services in both the industrialised and developing countries. Europe’s first major drive to boost eco-innovation came with the Environmental Technologies Action Plan (ETAP). Adopted in 2004, this Action Plan focused on the further development and use of environmental technologies. Its goal was to tackle the financial, economic and institutional barriers hindering growth of these technologies, as well as to encourage their adoption by the market.

WHIM architecture has drawn up the blueprint for a “recycled island” that will make use of waste recovered from the marine environment to construct floating living spaces.

Image: Screenshot website http://ec.europa.eu/.

October 2013

Support from the Creative industries fund NL.

The research to explore the potential of recycling the plastic pollution in the river the Maas to a new floating landscape is supported by the Creative industries fund NL. This support allows us to work more intensively on the project and to set up new collaborations to move this project towards realization. Within the project we are looking into the possibilities of creating a new floating park landscape with the recycled plastics as an important building material.

 

The Creative Industries Fund NL began operating on 1 January 2013. It operates within the context of the Dutch government’s culture policy and focuses on all the designing disciplines and on E-culture in a broad sense.

Image: First sketch Floating park of recycled plastic in Rotterdam